8 Online Etiquette Rules Every Tween Should Know

Topics: Parental Intelligence, the cloak of anonymity, online etiquette, social media etiquette tips, sub-tweeting

When an Adult Engages in Cyberbullying Against a Child

Topics: Parental Intelligence, Kindergarten girl becomes victim of cyberbullying, adults cyberbullying, adults cyberbullying kids, adults on social media

Adult Bullying: Harassment By People You Respect

Topics: cyberbullying, Parental Intelligence, adults setting a good example online, adults cyberbullying, adult bullying

To LOL, or Not To LOL? That is The Question

Topics: Parental Intelligence, LOL evolved into new meaning, LOL overused, using LOL, laughing out loud

Superintendent Viciously Cyberbullied By Students

Topics: Parental Intelligence, Superintendent brutally cyberbullied by students, superintendent cyberbullied, kids cyberbullying adults, students cyberbullying

Why Texting Rules: The Silver Lining Parents Are Missing

Topics: Parental Intelligence, texting is good, silver lining to texting, parents texting, texting makes parenting easier

Cyberbullying More Strongly Related to Suicidal Thoughts

Topics: Parental Intelligence, teen suicide, bullycide, cyberbully suicide, cyberbullied suicidal thoughts

Teaching Kids and Teens Media Smarts During Breaking News

Topics: Parental Intelligence, teach kids and teens media smarts, breaking news, teaching kids media skills, breaking news inaccurate

Digital Parents are asking: What is the social networking site Bebo?

Topics: Parental Intelligence, connected kids, blogging, phone app, social networks

7-Day Digital Cleanse for College-Bound Kids

Topics: online reputation, Parental Intelligence, colleges checking kids social media, digital cleanse for teens, digital cleanse

The Pros and Cons of Xbox: Is Xbox Good for Kids?

Topics: Parental Intelligence, Xbox, xbox live, is xbox good for kids, what is xbox live?

What is Tumblr? Learn the Ins and Outs of the Popular Blogging Site

Topics: Parental Intelligence, blogging safety, teen blogging, tumblr, what is tumblr

I'd Rather Lose My Ford or My Finger Than My Phone

Topics: Parental Intelligence, cellphone addiction study, cellphone dependence, I'd rather lose my finger than my phone, study about cellphones

Social Media Etiquette Tips for Teenagers

Topics: Parental Intelligence, password protection, online etiquette, social media etiquette tips, social media for teenagers

Utah Mom's Facebook Check May Have Saved Son From Shooting Plot

Topics: Parental Intelligence, parental monitoring, facebook monitoring, Mom's Facebook check saved son's life, Mom saves son from shooting plot

How to Use Media to Raise Resilient Kids

Topics: digital parenting, Parental Intelligence, raise kids resiliently, positive online activities for kids, how to raise resilient kids

What is Facebook?

Topics: Parental Intelligence, what is facebook, Facebook statistics, Facebook facts, how do I use facebook?

No Such Thing as a Bully: Shred the Label

Topics: Parental Intelligence, how to teach kids not to bully, adults setting a good example online, adults cyberbullying, bully label, Parental Intelligence Company

Digital Parenting: 11 Facts About Cyberbullying

Topics: cyberbullying, Parental Intelligence, cyberbullying statistics, cyberbullying facts, DoSomething.org

Cyberbullying Facts and Resources for Parents

Topics: cyberbullying, Parental Intelligence, cyberbullying resources, how to handle cyberbullying, cyberbullying facts

LATEST POSTS

8 Online Etiquette Rules Every Tween Should Know

Posted by Steven Woda

April 22, 2014 at 11:28 AM

With college administrators and employers often checking candidates’ social network profiles, it’s more important than ever to ensure that your tweens are representing themselves online appropriately. Social Media “Netiquette” consists of a variety of factors including language used, tones emitted through word choice and sentence structure, and the manners in which people conduct themselves when posting behind screens (especially when done anonymously).

Luckily, teenagers admit that social media etiquette is an important factor in their lives. A recent Teen Trend Report from a Stage of Life survey found that 91% of teens indicate that civility, manners and etiquette are either “important” or “very important” to them. 69.3% (the majority) of teens say that they learn “bad manners” from the media, whereas 97% of teens expressed that they learn their “good manners” at home.

With uKnow’s Social Media Etiquette Twitter Party around the corner, we asked social media bloggers, consultants, and authors about their top concerns and rules for tweens’ social media ‘netiquette’. More than anything, the contributors emphasize how easy it is to be offensive online, whether someone is intending to offend or not. See what they believe are the most important facets of social media etiquette.

1. Post for Your Future

Read More

Topics: Parental Intelligence, the cloak of anonymity, online etiquette, social media etiquette tips, sub-tweeting

When an Adult Engages in Cyberbullying Against a Child

Posted by Tim Woda

April 21, 2014 at 5:12 PM

Although it is alarming to learn about adults cyberbullying other adults, it is even more disturbing to hear about cases in which adults cyberbully kids. Earlier this month we posted an article about how a kindergarten girl was cyberbullied following a trip to Walmart. More details on the incident have since been released.

Cyberbullying most often manifests when children, especially teens, use smart phones, the Internet, and social media to torment another child. However, cyberbullying is not exclusively conducted by kids, targeting kids.

One of the first cases of an adult cyberbullying a child took place recently in Seneca, South Carolina. The incident began when an unnamed six year old girl, who appears to be on the heavy side and has some health issues related to her weight, had her picture taken and posted online as a joke. The man who took the picture posted it on his Facebook page with the caption “Honey Boo Boo at Walmart.” 

The cyberbully in question: Walhalla High School Assistant Principal Charlie Fowler. 

Read More

Topics: Parental Intelligence, Kindergarten girl becomes victim of cyberbullying, adults cyberbullying, adults cyberbullying kids, adults on social media

Adult Bullying: Harassment By People You Respect

Posted by Steven Woda

April 21, 2014 at 12:24 PM

Social media etiquette starts at home. Read on to learn about how cyberbullying is not conducted just by kids and teens. This article was originally published on The Huffington Post by writer, author, and blogger Sue Scheff. Check out her blog here.

Adult bullying is more prevalent than many want to admit. If you're old enough to pay a mortgage or raise a family, shouldn't you be able to handle anything that comes your way? But bullying doesn't come to a standstill after graduating from the playground, and giving grown-ups a pass on aggressive behavior only sets a bad example for our children still on the playground.

A while back, I discussed the case of a parent who felt the need to air her laundry (dirty and clean) all over her Facebook timeline. Her thoughts were broadcasted publicly, even for her children to see. Additionally, a group of mothers recently took to Facebook to bash pictures of toddlers. These behaviors make kids think: if my own mother can bully, then why can't I?

In case we needed another reminder that no one -- not even 300-pound offensive linemen -- is immune to being victimized look no further than the Jonathan Martin case earlier this month. Bullying is entrenched in the NFL, as is the idea that what goes on in the locker room, should stay in the locker room -- including hazing. The incessant tormenting from Martin's teammate, Richie Incognito, forced him to take leave from the team and admit himself to a hospital for emotional distress.

Read More

Topics: cyberbullying, Parental Intelligence, adults setting a good example online, adults cyberbullying, adult bullying

To LOL, or Not To LOL? That is The Question

Posted by Steven Woda

April 20, 2014 at 9:58 AM

In the world of Social Media Etiquette, the acronym LOL is quickly evolving into a term with different meaning than "laughing out loud". Think about the last time you used LOL or saw it used: did it really indicate that you/they were literally laughing out loud? This article was originally published on USA Today by AP National Writer Martha Irvine.

If I thought something in a casual online conversation was funny, I typed it. If I wanted to let someone know I was kidding in an e-mail or an instant message, same.

I might've even felt a little cool, using inside lingo that, at one time, was exclusive to the online world. (You know I'm not the only one who thought so.)

Today, though, I'm sensing a shift, even in my own thoughts about LOL. Certainly, it's as ubiquitous as ever. Just search for it on Twitter or Facebook to see how often people use it. Not exactly deep and meaningful stuff, mind you, but there sure is a lot of it.

Perhaps that's why, at least in some circles, LOL has lost its cachet. And at its worst, it's making people a little cranky.

Read More

Topics: Parental Intelligence, LOL evolved into new meaning, LOL overused, using LOL, laughing out loud

Superintendent Viciously Cyberbullied By Students

Posted by Steven Woda

April 19, 2014 at 2:42 PM

Clearly, the negative effects of cyberbullying are not limited to just teens and kids. Find out what happened when students cyberbullied their Superintendent following his decision about having a snow day. This article was originally published on the Washington Post and is written by Donna St. George and Jennifer Jenkins.

Forecasts for snow in Montgomery County often means a bit of “cyberpleading” — e-mails or tweets that vigorously urge officials to close schools for the day.

That happened during last week’s winter-like weather, but a number of messages to Superintendent Joshua P. Starr did more to offend than persuade. Some used racial epithets. Some used curse words. One threatened to slash Starr’s tires. A few messages mentioned Starr’s family in inappropriate ways, he said.

In all, Starr said, perhaps 10 tweets left him thinking: “Whoa, this is going too far.”

Hoping to spark a conversation across Maryland’s largest school system, Starr e-mailed a letter Friday to the parents of Montgomery’s 151,300 students.

“We need to talk about ‘cybercivility’: how we can help our children grow into responsible and caring adults who interact with one another in a civil, respectful way,” Starr wrote in his letter, which schools officials tweeted, e-mailed to newsletter subscribers and posted online.

Read More

Topics: Parental Intelligence, Superintendent brutally cyberbullied by students, superintendent cyberbullied, kids cyberbullying adults, students cyberbullying

Why Texting Rules: The Silver Lining Parents Are Missing

Posted by Tim Woda

April 18, 2014 at 11:54 AM

Texting can be regarded positively or negatively in a household. Learn how to see the silver lining of texting and end up using it as a tool for digital parenting. This article was originally published on The Huffington Post by John Duffy.

My son George, my one and only child, is now an 18-year-old man. In a few short months, we will be dropping him off at college. He's busy focusing on his senior year in high school. That moment hugging his Mom and I goodbye on some quad a few months from now isn't remotely on his radar. For him, it's just some hazy, remote construct of a distant future.

But my wife Julie and I sense that hourglass emptying, that moment approaching in double time. We take turns being upbeat and distraught, our scripts ranging from how exciting this next chapter will be for him and how ready he is, to how quiet and dead this house will feel come September. We are both working overtime to be available to every moment with him, every swim meet, awards ceremony, late night talk, even silent breakfast. We drink him in, knowing soon, this iteration of our lives together ends.

Now, today is Saturday, and after sleeping in, I thought George and I might grab a sandwich, a frequent weekend tradition for us.

But today, he had plans with his buddies. He jumped in the shower, grabbed car keys and bounced. Of course, that's how it should be: a guy should spend Saturday having a good time with his buddies, not hanging around with Dad. That would have been my last choice at 18 too. Still, as he pulled away, I swear I could hear the opening notes of "Cat's in the Cradle" swelling gently in the background. Lump in my throat, I made alternate plans. I began to work, distractedly, in silence.

Read More

Topics: Parental Intelligence, texting is good, silver lining to texting, parents texting, texting makes parenting easier

Cyberbullying More Strongly Related to Suicidal Thoughts

Posted by Tim Woda

April 17, 2014 at 11:34 AM

Children who are bullied are twice as likely to have suicidal thoughts than children who are not bullied, and cyberbullying is more closely linked to suicidal thoughts than in-person harassment according to a new study published in JAMA pediatrics. 

Conducted by researchers in the Netherlands, the study analyzed data from 34 other studies involving almost 300,000 participants. Researchers found that students who were bullied were almost twice as likely to consider killing themselves and two and a half times more likely to actually attempt suicide. The higher risk was found among various age groups and affected both genders.

Read More

Topics: Parental Intelligence, teen suicide, bullycide, cyberbully suicide, cyberbullied suicidal thoughts

Teaching Kids and Teens Media Smarts During Breaking News

Posted by Tim Woda

April 16, 2014 at 3:45 PM

With constant breaking news streaming in through media outlets and social networks, kids and teens need to know how to digest and decipher news reports. Teach them the basics of how to filter out what is accurate and important in the news world. This article was originally published on Common Sense Media and is written by Sierra Filucci.

When big news breaks, it's easy to get caught up in following the news online. But while the Internet -- from major news sites to Twitter -- can be a valuable place to find useful information, it can also be the source of misinformation. Helping kids and teens understand the news and how to separate fact from fiction is an important job for parents and educators.

Here's some advice parents can offer kids and teens who consume the news:

Remember, breaking news is often wrong. In the rush to cover stories, reporters make mistakes, officials don't always have correct information, and tidbits that sound plausible often get passed around before anyone can check for accuracy. One Texas TV station reported through closed captioning that Zooey Deschanel was one of the accused Boston Marathon bombers!

Read More

Topics: Parental Intelligence, teach kids and teens media smarts, breaking news, teaching kids media skills, breaking news inaccurate

Digital Parents are asking: What is the social networking site Bebo?

Posted by Tim Woda

April 16, 2014 at 1:19 PM

Bebo is a free social network for users to keep friends “in the loop” and connect with the best entertainment. Users communicate with each other through profiles, chat, photos, games, and comments. Bebo is accessible with any Internet-enabled device, including mobile phones.

How do you sign up?

Users log in to Bebo with their Facebook or AOL account information, or they can sign up directly with Bebo by providing their full name, email address, gender and date of birth (there is a checkbox under the date of birth to hide it from the public profile.) Profiles of people under 18 are private by default.

What can you do on Bebo?

The profile page is a place for users to post blogs, photos, videos, and questionnaires. Everyone who can view a user's personal profile can also post comments to their “Whiteboard.” People can manage their Whiteboard by erasing (deleting) offensive comments and/or blocking users from communicating with them or leaving comments on their profile.

Read More

Topics: Parental Intelligence, connected kids, blogging, phone app, social networks

7-Day Digital Cleanse for College-Bound Kids

Posted by Steven Woda

April 15, 2014 at 10:29 AM

We already know that poor social media decisions can impact a teen or tween's future. Read on to learn about how a 7-day cleanse can help them refresh their online reputations. This article was originally published on McAfee Blog Central by Toni Birdsong.

Sorry, this post will not push the health benefits of a kale-flax smoothie (although they do rock). But, if your aspiring college student follows this 7-Day Digital Cleanse for a full week, he is bound to become more digitally fit. (Disclaimer: the side effects of the 7-Day Digital Cleanse could be life changing and dream saving).

By now we all know about the fallout that can happen when young people with big dreams fail to post properly on social media sites. We’ve seen Olympic athletes sent home for a tweet, a zillion people get fired, and college scholarships revoked because a tweet or photo made it to the desk of a college decision maker. 

In 2013, Kaplan Test Prep surveyed nearly 400 college admissions officers and found that 30% said they found something online that negatively impacted the applicant’s chances of getting admitted. On the flip side, when canvassing students in a separate study, Kaplan found that 50% of students admitted they would “not be concerned” about an admissions officer researching them online while 27% said they were “not too concerned,” and 14% said they were “very concerned.”

Offenses cited in the admissions study included essay plagiarism, vulgarities in blogs, alcohol consumption in photos and “illegal activities.”

Read More

Topics: online reputation, Parental Intelligence, colleges checking kids social media, digital cleanse for teens, digital cleanse

The Pros and Cons of Xbox: Is Xbox Good for Kids?

Posted by Steven Woda

April 14, 2014 at 10:41 AM

Many parents today are wondering if Xbox is good for kids, and while there is much debate about this topic, the findings tend to show there may be more cons than pros when it comes to kids playing the popular video game system. With complaints that this kind of gaming leaves kids too isolated from others to concerns over damaged vision from staring at the screen, parents and educators everywhere are very wary of the potential negative effects.

Yet, there are positive effects that can come from playing Xbox and Xbox Live. Xbox Live is a feature of Xbox which enables the player to game online against their friends or other people. Both Xbox and Xbox Live can have plenty of positive and negative impacts on kids.

Pros

Some of the most common positive effects of playing video games include that Xbox:

  • Increases self-confidence

Read More

Topics: Parental Intelligence, Xbox, xbox live, is xbox good for kids, what is xbox live?

What is Tumblr? Learn the Ins and Outs of the Popular Blogging Site

Posted by Steven Woda

April 13, 2014 at 7:38 PM

Tumblr is a free microblogging site where users quickly and easily post short snippets of text, quotes, photos, videos, links, music, or whatever else interests them in a rapid-fire fashion.

How does Tumblr Work?

Whenever users stumble across something they like online, they can click a “share on tumblr” bookmarklet to automatically post it to their blog. They can also publish new posts by emailing or texting them to tumblr. The result is a tumblelog: a microblog consisting of short, quick mixed-media posts.

Read More

Topics: Parental Intelligence, blogging safety, teen blogging, tumblr, what is tumblr

I'd Rather Lose My Ford or My Finger Than My Phone

Posted by Tim Woda

April 13, 2014 at 10:48 AM

This article was originally posted on The Huffington Post by Tim Elmore.

In case you're wondering how kids today think, new research enables us to answer that question and see how absolutely different they are from their elders.

According to recent Pew Research, adolescents put technology in the same category as air and water. They feel they need it to live their lives. In fact, they would rather give up their pinky finger than their mobile device. I interpret this to mean they use their smartphone far more than they do their smallest finger. Incredible.

Read More

Topics: Parental Intelligence, cellphone addiction study, cellphone dependence, I'd rather lose my finger than my phone, study about cellphones

Social Media Etiquette Tips for Teenagers

Posted by Steven Woda

April 12, 2014 at 10:06 AM

This article was originally published on Psychology Today by Raychelle Cassanda Lohmann.

Computers and modern technology are taking up a lot of teens' time. While there are some perks to technology, there are also some negative things associated with it. A national survey by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation found that kids between the ages of 8 to 18 are spending an average of 7 hours and 38 minutes per day using entertainment media (e.g., phones, computer, television, mp3 players or other electronic devices). That's more than 53 hours a week! And because our teens are so good at watching TV while working on the computer or texting a friend, they have used their time-management skills to fit about 10 hours and 45 minutes worth of media content into those 7 hours and 38 minutes.

With teens spending so much time working on-line via social networking sites, emailing, texting, visiting chat rooms, or just surfing the net, it's important that parents review the following Cyber Etiquette tips with their teen.

Top 10 Cyber Etiquette Tips:

1. Exercise the Golden Rule - Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. If you wouldn't speak to the person that way face to face, then don't do it online.

Read More

Topics: Parental Intelligence, password protection, online etiquette, social media etiquette tips, social media for teenagers

Utah Mom's Facebook Check May Have Saved Son From Shooting Plot

Posted by Tim Woda

April 11, 2014 at 9:33 AM

Viewing your kids' social media interactions can be life-saving. Learn about how a smart mother was able to avert a possible tragedy by tracking her son's Facebook profile. This article was originally published on The Huffington Post by Ed Mazza.

A Utah woman may have saved her son's life by doing the one thing many kids hate the most: Checking him out on Facebook.

When the mother discovered threats to shoot the teen, she contacted police, according to local media reports.

"She had actually read threats and seen the threat on his Facebook page," Salt Lake police detective Greg Wilking told the Deseret News. "There were very specific threats that they were going to go the high school and shoot her son."

Read More

Topics: Parental Intelligence, parental monitoring, facebook monitoring, Mom's Facebook check saved son's life, Mom saves son from shooting plot

How to Use Media to Raise Resilient Kids

Posted by Tim Woda

April 9, 2014 at 9:25 PM

This article was originally published on Common Sense Media by blogger Deborah Gilboa.

You've heard of helicopter parenting. But how about those parents who don't only hover -- they're out there in front of their kids clearing every obstacle? I call them "snow blower" or "lawnmower" parents, and although their efforts to protect their kids come from a good place, they're not allowing them to develop the skills they need to recover from setbacks -- to be resilient, in other words.

I'm part of a growing movement of what I call "Resilience Parents." We're doing our best to raise kids who can clear most of their own obstacles -- and get back up when they run full speed into one they didn't see.

Read More

Topics: digital parenting, Parental Intelligence, raise kids resiliently, positive online activities for kids, how to raise resilient kids

What is Facebook?

Posted by Tim Woda

April 9, 2014 at 4:20 PM

Facebook Quick Facts:

  • Facebook is the largest social networking site on the planet

  • 845 million monthly active users as of December 2011

  • 80% of our monthly active users are outside the U.S. and Canada

Read More

Topics: Parental Intelligence, what is facebook, Facebook statistics, Facebook facts, how do I use facebook?

No Such Thing as a Bully: Shred the Label

Posted by Steven Woda

April 9, 2014 at 10:43 AM

Here's an article coming from our friends Kelly Karius and Sue Scheff! Kelly Karius elaborates on a previous article written by Sue Scheff and shares insight about where bullying labels develop and how to change our way of thinking regarding the issue.

I was drawn to Sue Scheff’s Huffington Post article “Grownup Bullying and Monster Moms”Immediately. She had me from Hello. “I know bullying and cyberbullying is a topic that many people are becoming immune to.”

We are. And I believe I know why. Two reasons:

  1. We are currently labeling everything bullying.

  2. Adults don’t acknowledge their behavior. So why should children?

Read More

Topics: Parental Intelligence, how to teach kids not to bully, adults setting a good example online, adults cyberbullying, bully label, Parental Intelligence Company

Digital Parenting: 11 Facts About Cyberbullying

Posted by Tim Woda

April 8, 2014 at 5:22 PM

Earlier today we published an article that demonstrates how parents can use cyberbullying facts and resources to protect kids and teens from cyberbullying dangers. View these facts to further educate yourself on the issue of cyberbullying. These statistics were originally published on DoSomething.org

“Cyberbullying” is defined as a young person tormenting, threatening, harassing, or embarrassing another young person using the Internet or other technologies, like cell phones. The psychological and emotional outcomes of cyberbullying are similar to those of real-life bullying. The difference is, real-life bullying often ends when school ends. For cyberbullying, there is no escape. And, it’s getting worse. Read on to get the facts.

Read More

Topics: cyberbullying, Parental Intelligence, cyberbullying statistics, cyberbullying facts, DoSomething.org

Cyberbullying Facts and Resources for Parents

Posted by Steven Woda

April 8, 2014 at 10:51 AM

Cyberbullying has become a hot-button issue in the past decade. As children and teens of all ages use the Internet in larger numbers, it has become a tool that can be used to harass and intimidate other children even when they are not in the classroom. What should parents know about cyberbullying and where can parents find cyberbullying facts and resources?

Go Online

There are many resources that you can use to gather cyberbullying facts to equip youtself into becoming more educated about the issue. When you educate yourself on the true scope of cyberbullying, it makes it easier to deal with the problem as a parent. If you discover that your child has been bullied online or is bullying others online, you can discuss cyberbullying facts that you have learned to help your child escape the abuse or stop abusing others.

Read More

Topics: cyberbullying, Parental Intelligence, cyberbullying resources, how to handle cyberbullying, cyberbullying facts